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Indexes in Oracle :Index Scan Methods :Part 2
 
30:18
The Video Explains when should you create indexes. The difference between Simple and composite Index, Relevance of order in composite indexes and Index Scan Methods in detail. 1.Index Unique scan 2.Index Range Scan 3. Index Skip Scan 4. Fast full Index Scan 5. Full Index Scan If you have any questions just drop in a comment
Views: 3839 Tech Coach
06 06 Index Full Scan Operations
 
03:27
ORACLE
Views: 684 oracle ocm
A Story of Indexes and Full Table Scans: Finding All the Red Sweets Part 1
 
08:43
"Why isn't Oracle using my index?!" is a common question people have when tuning SQL queries. In this episode Chris compares two methods for finding all the red candies from party bags he's prepared. He shows how these are like a full table scan and an index range scan. He goes on to compare the performance of these two approaches. He shows when a full table scan becomes more efficient than an index range scan and vice versa. ============================ The Magic of SQL with Chris Saxon Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Views: 6828 The Magic of SQL
What is Index Scan ,Index Seek and Table Scan?
 
06:34
An index scan or table scan is when SQL Server has to scan the data or index pages to find the appropriate records. index seek happens when data is searched among the index.Please watch full video for detail.
Views: 15397 SqlIsEasy
Oracle Indexes - Live Demonstration
 
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When is a Full Table Scan faster than an Index Scan? Watch Ross and Jordan act out an Oracle database reading and caching data via both methods, explaining the costs and benefits in simple and easy to understand terms. The demonstration is part of a talk by Ross Leishman of DWS Ltd on the principles of Understanding Indexes for SQL Tuning. The full lecture is at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4hKomnGHFA DWS Ltd is a leading publicly listed Australian IT Services company, providing services to blue chip organisations since 1991. With a business philosophy based upon integrity, reliability and professional service delivery, DWS provides end to end IT solutions. www.dws.com.au
Views: 2623 DWS Ltd
Oracle || Indexes Part-1 by dinesh
 
32:23
DURGASOFT is INDIA's No.1 Software Training Center offers online training on various technologies like JAVA, .NET , ANDROID,HADOOP,TESTING TOOLS ,ADF,INFORMATICA,TABLEAU,IPHONE,OBIEE,ANJULAR JS, SAP... courses from Hyderabad & Bangalore -India with Real Time Experts. Mail us your requirements to [email protected] so that our Supporting Team will arrange Demo Sessions. Ph:Call +91-8885252627,+91-7207212428,+91-7207212427,+91-8096969696. http://durgasoft.com http://durgasoftonlinetraining.com https://www.facebook.com/durgasoftware http://durgajobs.com https://www.facebook.com/durgajobsinfo......
Oracle Hints Tutorial for improving performance
 
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Oracle Hints Tutorial for improving performance APPEND PARALLEL JOIN INDEX NO_INDEX SELECT /*+ FIRST_ROWS(10) */ * FROM emp WHERE deptno = 10; SELECT /*+ ALL_ROWS */ * FROM emp WHERE deptno = 10; SELECT /*+ NO_INDEX(emp emp_dept_idx) */ * FROM emp, dept WHERE emp.deptno = dept.deptno; SELECT /*+ INDEX(e,emp_dept_idx) */ * FROM emp e WHERE e.deptno = 10; -- SELECT /*+ INDEX(scott.emp,emp_dept_idx) */ * FROM scott.emp; SELECT /*+ AND_EQUAL(e,emp_dept_idx) */ * FROM emp e; SELECT /*+ INDEX_JOIN(e,emp_dept_idx) */ * FROM emp e; SELECT /*+ PARALLEL_INDEX(e,emp_dept_idx , 8) */ * FROM emp e; SELECT /*+ LEADING (dept) */ * FROM emp, dept WHERE emp.deptno = dept.deptno; SELECT /*+ PARALLEL(8) CACHE (e) FULL (e) */ * FROM emp e ; SELECT /*+ PARALLEL FULL (e) */ * FROM emp e ; SELECT /*+ PARALLEL USE_MERGE (emp dept) */ * FROM emp, dept WHERE emp.deptno = dept.deptno; -- SORT Merge Join SELECT /*+ PARALLEL USE_HASH (emp dept) */ * FROM emp, dept WHERE emp.deptno = dept.deptno; -- Hash Join SELECT /*+ PARALLEL */ * FROM emp e ; INSERT /*+ APPEND */ INTO mytmp select /*+ CACHE (e) */ *from emp e; commit;
Views: 3616 TechLake
Oracle SQL Tutorial 8 - Indexes - Database Design Primer 5
 
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The concept of an index is extremely important when managing a database. An index has the power of making your database very quick or it has the power to bog down your update, delete, and insert statements. The trick is to find a good balance. You will want to index any columns that are used continually in a select or a join. By default, all primary keys are indexed as well as any columns with the UNIQUE column attribute. I suggest you consider adding an index to your foreign keys as these will often be used in joins as well. You can actually create an index on a group of columns. This will allow you to search for data and return multiple columns. This is known as a composite index. There are many other things to database design...much more than we have covered. I have decided I will cover these as we go so that we can start applying what we learn practically. Support me: http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/-8qtH Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 13722 Caleb Curry
Fast Application Notification
 
04:52
Fast Application Notification (FAN) is a RAC feature that was integrated with Oracle Call Interface (OCI) in Oracle Database 10g Release 2. For more information on this course, please visit https://www.koenig-solutions.com/oracle-training-certification-courses.aspx
Views: 80 Koenig Solutions
Oracle || Oracle Index by  Siva
 
17:55
DURGASOFT is INDIA's No.1 Software Training Center offers online training on various technologies like JAVA, .NET , ANDROID,HADOOP,TESTING TOOLS , ADF, INFORMATICA,TABLEAU,IPHONE,OBIEE,ANJULAR JS, SAP... courses from Hyderabad & Bangalore -India with Real Time Experts. Mail us your requirements to [email protected] so that our Supporting Team will arrange Demo Sessions. Ph:Call +91-8885252627,+91-7207212428,+91-7207212427,+91-8096969696. http://durgasoft.com http://durgasoftonlinetraining.com https://www.facebook.com/durgasoftware http://durgajobs.com https://www.facebook.com/durgajobsinfo............
What Impact Do Indexes Have on Inserts?: Finding All the Red Sweets Part 0
 
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Creating indexes can improve query performance. Oracle must maintain the indexes however. This increases the work it must do whenever you modify data in indexed columns. In this video Chris looks at this overhead using a real world analogy - recording the color of all the candies stored in party bags! ============================ The Magic of SQL with Chris Saxon Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Views: 2407 The Magic of SQL
Why Is My Query Slow? More Reasons Storing Dates as Numbers Is Bad
 
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Storing dates as numbers can cause unexpected problems. In this video Chris looks at one possible issue: inconsistent query performance. He then shows methods you can use to improve performance, including function-based indexes and histograms. ============================ The Magic of SQL with Chris Saxon Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Views: 6107 The Magic of SQL
Oracle Performance Tips - Indexes
 
03:58
Learn about index and types of indexes.
Views: 1829 Saurabh Kumar
Which Order Should Columns Go in an Index?: Finding All the Red Sweets Part 4
 
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When you create an index on multiple columns there's an important question you need to answer: In which order should you list the columns? This video looks at some of the factors you should consider to help answer this question. ============================ The Magic of SQL with Chris Saxon Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Views: 3480 The Magic of SQL
Index Compression in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.2)
 
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A quick intro to the new Advanced Index Compression in Oracle Database 12c release 1 (12.1.0.2). This functionality is part of the Advanced Compression Option
Views: 2082 Dominic Giles
Making Smart Scan for Exadata Work (Demonstration)
 
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Making Smart Scan Work - Demo I'll go through a simple example of the kind of thing we need to think about when trying to achieve Smart Scan. Let me just enable tracing, run a simple query, select and * from *. Now, there's my query. The result set comes back, and how is it executed? An index full scan with the PK* index. The optimizer is intelligent enough to know that my query can be satisfied purely by reading the index and therefore it didn't have to go to the table at all. It looks very good. Well, it wasn't. Index full scans are an operation that cannot be offloaded. So, to execute that statement, every block of that index was delivered into the buffer cache of my own database instance, and the compute node then has to do the work of extracting those values. What can we do about it? One solution would be to hint the code. I select and demand an index fast full scan, and now we see the magic word "storage." An index fast full scan is offloadable, because an index fast full scan can do direct reads. An alternative approach? Well, you might not want to hint many, many thousands of lines of code. An alternative approach would be to do it through DDL. For example, take that index, make it invisible. Now run my statements without any hint at all, table access storage full, and that was offloaded. Having made the index invisible, Oracle has no option but a full-table scan, and a full-table scan is offloadable. Now, this means I have three options of this very simple example. I can let the optimizer get on with what it wants to do, and then I use an index that I'm doing block serving into the buffer cache. I can hint the code, index fast full scan. That's probably the best option for performance, but it's also the most work. In this intervening case, I make the index invisible so that it will still be used of course for enforcing the primary key constraints, but it will not be visible to the optimizer and therefore influence the optimizer towards using plans that can be offloaded the Smart Scan. Making the choice between this and influencing the optimizer in the correct direction is an extremely difficult job, and it is not always easy to determine what is going to be the best solution.
Views: 2944 SkillBuilders
SQL Server Execution Plan Operators
 
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Table scans, clustered index scans, merge joins, sorts, and more.
Views: 24952 Brent Ozar Unlimited
SQL tutorial 62: Indexes In Oracle Database By Manish Sharma RebellionRider
 
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Watch and learn concepts of SQL Index In Oracle Database. In this tutorial you will learn about B-Tree Index and Function based Index. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog : Previous Tutorial ► ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Help Me In Getting A Job◄◄◄ ►Help Me In Getting A Good Job By Connecting With Me on My LinkedIn and Endorsing My Skills. All My Contact Info is Down Below. You Can Also Refer Me To Your Company Thanks ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Copy Cloud referral link || Use this link to join copy cloud and get 20GB of free storage https://copy.com?r=kb4rc1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Amazon Wishlist: http://bit.ly/wishlist-amazon ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider https://www.facebook.com/imthebhardwaj http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ http://rebellionrider.tumblr.com/ http://www.pinterest.com/rebellionrider/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 37892 Manish Sharma
SQL Tuning for Beginners 8 How to Read Execution Plan Part 2
 
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Learn how to tune Oracle SQL statements! You'll need to know how to read an execution plan. See all FREE lessons http://www.skillbuilders.com/sql-tuning-for-beginners-free-tutorial
Views: 517 SkillBuilders
Oracle Exadata Smart Scan - Limitations and Best Practices
 
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Smart Scan is a wonderful capability, but you don't always get it. It's impossible for many execution plans, and this is a major restriction. If you think about what a Smart Scan actually does, it delivers individual columns, individual rows back to the instance. Now, a buffer cache can accept only blocks. Therefore, Smart Scan cannot possibly put those columns of rows into the buffer cache. It's simply not formatted appropriately. So, a Smart Scan has to return values directly into the session's PGA or, to put it another way, the only access method that can use Smart Scan is direct read. Well, what access methods can use direct read? There are only two, which are table full scan and index fast full scan. Any other access method, typically index range scan, table access by row ID, cannot use a Smart Scan. The second major issue, there are strict limitations of the type of objects that can be accessed through Smart Scan. It really is only heap tables. You can't use indexes. You can't use clusters. You can't use IOTs. Heap tables only. Perhaps hardest to track down and giving sometimes very erratic results is that Smart Scan can be interrupted by various conditions. You've met all the requirements for Smart Scan, directory and so on, got the right execution plan. The Smart Scan starts and then hits something that causes a problem. Issues that we know cause problems are, for instance, read consistency, also delayed block cleanout, change rows. Any of those issues and a few others mean that the storage tier will have to interrupt its Smart Scan, deliver complete blocks into that buffer cache, let your session then do what is necessary to the block, and only then can the Smart Scan proceed. Now, in order to maximize the use of Smart Scan, there may be quite a lot of work. Very often, you'll have to adjust your index structures. Making them invisible is a nice technique there. There are many, many, many parameters that can influence the likelihood of achieving a Smart Scan, and almost inevitably you're going to be rewriting a lot of hint SQL and putting hints in it to get the correct execution plans that can enable a Smart Scan to occur. This is all because of one fundamental problem; the optimizer is not in any way aware of the Exadata. The optimizer develops an execution plan in exactly the way it would without the Exadata storage. The use of Smart Scan, the awareness of Exadata comes at the next level down. The optimizer develops the plan through a normal pass and then passes it through to the SQL execution engine, and it's the SQL execution engine that determines, on a case-by-case basis, whether to use the Smart Scan. This means that you might develop a plan and execute the statement 50 times. Forty-nine times, you get a Smart Scan. The 50th time, for whatever reason, the SQL execution engine decides not to. This can result in somewhat erratic performance.
Views: 1585 SkillBuilders
When to use Oracle Database Bitmap Indexes Lesson 2
 
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This lesson demonstrates cases where a *B-Tree* index cannot be used AND shows how Oracle will use a *bitmap* index. See all lessons, free, at http://www.skillbuilders.com/when-to-use-oracle-bitmap-indexes.
Views: 551 SkillBuilders
Database Design 39 - Indexes (Clustered, Nonclustered, Composite Index)
 
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This video covers the basics of indexes. Indexing is an extremely important step of database design. Without Indexes database queries can take a substantial amount of time and hog system resources. The main two classifications of indexes are clustered and non-clustered indexes. Clustered indexes are usually the primary key and determine how the data is actually stored in the table. These are the fastest and most effective. Non-clustered indexes sort a reference to data that is still fast but doesn't actually determine how the data is structured. The best tip I can give you is to use indexes but don't over use them. Having loads of indexes on columns that are barely ever in a where clause or join can bog down the database. This is because every time the table is updated the index must also be updated! When a database looks through a table for certain where conditions on a column that does not have an index, it does an entire table scan. This is not a good practice for large databases (or even small databases but not as bad). With an index the database will do an index seek and quickly find the data you are looking for. Composite indexes consist of two or more columns within one index. Use these when you plan on using the two columns together for a database query WHERE clause. Learn more about indexes here: https://www.calebcurry.com/blogs/database-design/introduction-to-indexes Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. Courses for Download: http://www.udemy.com/u/calebcurry/ (Use the coupon code "YouTubeDiscount" without the quotes) Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://Twitter.com/calebCurry Subscribe (it's free!): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZUyPT9DkJWmS_DzdOi7RIA?sub_confirmation=1 Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 84428 Caleb Curry
Clustered vs. Nonclustered Index Structures in SQL Server
 
08:04
Clustered and nonclustered indexes share many of the same internal structures, but they're fundamentally different in nature. Watch Microsoft Certified IT Professional Jon Seigel explain the similarities and differences of clustered and nonclustered indexes, using a real-world example to show how these structures work to improve the performance of SQL queries. Blog post on primary key vs. the clustered index: http://voluntarydba.com/post/2012/10/02/The-Primary-Key-vs-The-Clustered-Index.aspx CREATE INDEX statement reference: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188783.aspx ALTER INDEX statement reference: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188388.aspx Index navigation internals by example: http://sqlblog.com/blogs/paul_white/archive/2011/08/09/sql-server-seeks-and-binary-search.aspx Sample index data is from the AdventureWorksLT2008R2 sample database: http://awlt2008dbscript.codeplex.com/releases/view/46169 Visit my channel for more database administration videos: https://www.youtube.com/voluntarydba Subscribe to get notified about my latest videos: https://www.youtube.com/voluntarydba?sub_confirmation=1 Read additional content on my blog: http://voluntarydba.com Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/voluntarydba Like on Facebook: https://facebook.com/voluntarydba
Views: 260772 Voluntary DBA
07 07 Index Selectivity
 
07:56
ORACLE
Views: 281 oracle ocm
BitMap Indexes & Examples
 
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BitMap Indexes & Examples watch more videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Mr. Parth Panjab, Tutorials Point India Private Limited
Difference Between Delete and Truncate
 
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Below is link for Useful Pl/SQL Books http://goo.gl/XMy0tt ---------------------------------------------------------- Difference Between Delete and Truncate in Detail On bigger picture they serve the same purpose but there are many Differences listed with examples Point Delete Truncate 1. Data Recovery Delete: Come under the DML Category, we need to commit or Rollback explicitly to make the changes permanent, so we can recover the data by Rollback command fully with in a session or up to a point if Save Points are used Fall In DDL Category (DDL Command issue the Auto commit implicitly) so no chances of Recovery even not using the Flashback table method. But Truncate operations are also logged , they didn’t generate redo SQL but they are logged , view for truncated data info V$LOGMNR_CONTENTS 2. Data Removal Delete Can remove all or selected data using the Where Clause predicates. Or we can say delete any subset of rows We can Truncate complete table or a partition or sub partition of a table. 3. Speed Delete is Slower because oracle maintain the redo logs for Read Consistency (so that every session connected can see a consistent data at a given point of time ) Delete is very time consuming activity especially when table have numerous indexes and Triggers associated with table Faster as no data logs are maintained no associated trigger firing. 4. DML Triggers Firing DML (Delete) triggers associated with table will fire. DML Trigger will not fire in case of truncate method. 5. Flashback Technology Data can be recovered even after commit operation using Flashback Table options Flashback_transaction_query table will give what to recover and up to which point. Data cannot be recovered in truncate method by Flashback table option. 6. Referential Integrity Constraint Behavior if we don’t have related data in child table then we can delete the data from the parent table or we have variants like On Delete Cascade & on Delete set Null. We can’t truncate a table with enable Referential Integrity Constraint, even there is no data in the child table, we have to disable or drop the constraint if we want to truncate the table. Exception: Truncate is possible if the FK is self-referential means primary key and foreign key are on the same table. 7. Space De allocation or Space Utilization No extent reset with delete when deleting rows from a table, extents are not de allocated, So if there were 50 extents in the table before the deletion, there will still be 50 after the deletion. Truncate: When a table is truncated it will free the space allocated except in case of reuse storage clause. This space can subsequently be used only by new data in the table or cluster resulting from insert or update operations .All extents are de allocated leaving only the extents specified when the table was originally created .Example So if the table was originally created with min extents 3, there will be 3 extents remaining when the tables is truncated. When you truncate a table, NEXT is automatically reset to the last extent deleted. 8. High Water Mark Delete will not reset the high water mark Truncate will reset the High Water mark which is very important for performance point of view as in case of full table scan and full index scan oracle will read all the block under high water mark this makes a lot of difference in terms of performance. 9. Cluster No as such restriction with delete. You cannot individually truncate a table that is part of a cluster. You must truncate the cluster, Delete all rows from the table, or drop and re-create the table. 10. Information Capturing Delete : we can capture the row information what we have deleted using Delete Method, f you are deleting multiple records then use composite data types (collections & records) Truncate Don’t have this feature of capturing the deleted records. 11. Function Based Index Impact DELETE You cannot delete rows from a table if a function-based index on the table has become invalid. You must first validate the function-based index. Truncate: No as such restriction 12. UNUSABLE Indexes Delete no as such feature. Truncate if table is not empty then truncate make all unusable indexes to useable. 13. Complex views You cannot delete data from a Complex view except through INSTEAD OF triggers. But we can delete data from simple Views and MV. We cannot truncate a view simple or complex but you can truncate MV with special Features like Preserve MV Logs and Purge MV Logs. 14. Privileges Delete You need to provide delete table privilege on object. Truncate you must have drop table privilege there is no truncate table privilege exists. 15. Domain Index No as such restriction You cannot truncate the object having domain index in invalid or In progress state
Views: 12242 Ram Gupta
How Many Indexes Are Too Many?: Finding All The Red Sweets Part 5
 
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Every index you add to a table increases its storage requirements and DML overheads. So it's a good idea to create as few as possible. When you have two or more indexes using the same columns, you may be able to get away with just one. But how do you decide which to keep? This video discusses how to analyze your queries so you can cut the number of indexes you create. ============================ The Magic of SQL with Chris Saxon Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Views: 1973 The Magic of SQL
Why Won't Oracle Use My Index - 12c Attribute Clustering - Lesson 1
 
01:46
Sometimes a poor clustering factor is the cause when Oracle Database cost based optimizer does not choose to use an index. With Oracle 12c (12.1.0.2 EE) offers a new feature that can really help - "Atrribute Clustering". This is implemented with a new keyword on CREATE TABLE - "CLUSTERING BY LINEAR ORDER". In this Free Tutorial from SkillBuilders and Oracle Certified Master DBA John Watson, you'll get a brief refresher on clustering factor and a demonstration of CREATE TABLE - "CLUSTERING BY LINEAR ORDER" - so the CBO will use your index! In this first lesson, John will provide a brief review of clustering factor. See all 6 lessons - FREE - at http://www.skillbuilders.com/12c-attribute-clustering
Views: 345 SkillBuilders
【VDEDU】Unusable indexes use
 
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Unusable indexes in Oracle, DML statements are not use the index to its maintenance, at the same time the optimizer will not use the index. Unusable indexes no segment exists. Unavailable index index becomes available methods are: 1. Place the index can not be truncate operation corresponding table; 2.rebuild index; In addition, the query optimizer can use conversion method expand table so that the SQL statement has encountered unusable index partition table to generate better execution plans.
Views: 56 崔旭
SQL Index - Compare a clustered index vs a non clustered index
 
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http://sqlserver2008tutorial.com/ In this video training, we compare SQL indexes -- clustered index vs. non clustered index. In SQL server you can have one clustered index whereas you can have many non clustered index is. Using SQL Server Profiler and MS SQL Execution plans, we compare the clustered index and the nonclustered index. In this demo we show you how to create a clustered and non-clustered index using SSMS. Using different parameters like CPU, Number of Page Reads and Duration in msec, we come to a conclusion that the best option is to use a clustered index. Finally we go over index management and index fragmentation. We illustrate ALTER TABLE commands with Index Rebuild or Index Reorg. Other topics that we cover include a table scan; clustered index scan and an index seek.
Views: 50386 baghul
How to identify SQL statements in need of tuning with Spotlight on Oracle
 
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This video shows how to identify SQL statements in need of tuning with Spotlight on Oracle. https://www.quest.com/Spotlight-on-Oracle
Views: 759 DellTechCenter
Query Tuning 101: Access vs. Filter Predicates In Execution Plans
 
02:08
Have you ever wondered what the difference is between the "filter predicates" or "access predicates" steps listed in execution plans - or even what a predicate is? If so, watch this video to find out! Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Views: 4417 The Magic of SQL
Efficient Function Calls From SQL (Part 6) : Function-Based Indexes
 
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The sixth part of a mini-series of videos showing how you can improve the performance of function calls from SQL. In this episode, we look at using function-based indexes to improve the performance of queries that use function calls in the WHERE clause. For more information see: https://oracle-base.com/articles/8i/function-based-indexes https://oracle-base.com/articles/misc/efficient-function-calls-from-sql#functions-in-the-where-clause Website: https://oracle-base.com Blog: https://oracle-base.com/blog Twitter: https://twitter.com/oraclebase Cameo by Ronald Bradford : Blog: http://ronaldbradford.com/blog/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RonaldBradford Cameo appearances are for fun, not an endorsement of the content of this video.
Views: 1356 ORACLE-BASE.com
14.316 Covering and Composite Index, Duplicates, Overflow Pages, Composite Keys
 
12:03
Video for my inverted classroom "Database Systems". The complete list of videos and additional material is (will be) available at http://datenbankenlernen.de Computer Science, Saarland University: Bachelor (in German): http://www.cs.uni-saarland.de/index.php?id=52&L=1 Master (in English): http://www.cs.uni-saarland.de/index.php?id=132&L=1 Ph.D./Grad School: http://gradschool.cs.uni-saarland.de/
Oracle Optimization and Database Basics
 
37:36
Follow the full step by step Oracle 12c Training tutorial at: http://www.bisptrainings.com/course/Oracle-12c-Administration
Views: 755 Amit Sharma
Indexes in sql server   Part 35
 
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In this video we will learn about What are indexes Why do we use indexes Advantages of indexes These concepts are applicable to sql server 2000, 2005 and 2008 Text version of the video http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2012/09/indexes-in-sql-server-part-35.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2013/08/part-35-indexes.html All SQL Server Text Articles http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/free-sql-server-video-tutorials-for.html All SQL Server Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/sql-server.html All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists
Views: 340570 kudvenkat
mysql tutorial for beginners (6/8) : Indexes
 
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mysql tutorial for beginners (6/8) : Indexes As things stand, the table students works and can be searched without problem by MySQL—until it grows to more than a couple of hundred rows, At that point, database accesses will get slower and slower with every new row added, because MySQL has to search through every row whenever a query is issued. This is like searching through every book in a library whenever you need to look something up. Of course, you don’t have to search libraries that way, because they have either a card index system or, most likely, a database of their own. The way to achieve fast searches is to add an index, either when creating a table or at any time afterward. But the decision is not so simple. For example, there are different index types such as a regular INDEX, PRIMARY KEY, and FULLTEXT. Also, you must decide which columns require an index, a judgment that requires you to predict whether you will be searching any of the data in that column. And even when you’ve decided that, you still have the option of reducing index size by limiting the amount of each column to be indexed. If we imagine the searches that may be made on the students table, it becomes apparent that all of the columns may need to be searched. Anyway, go ahead and add an index to each of the columns, using the commands: ALTER TABLE students ADD INDEX(name(3)); An alternative to using ALTER TABLE to add an index is to use the CREATE INDEX command. They are equivalent, except that CREATE INDEX cannot be used for creating a PRIMARY KEY CREATE INDEX surname ON students (surname(5)); DESCRIBE students; These commands create indexes on both the name and surname columns, limiting name index to only the first 3 characters, and surname index to the first 5 characters. For instance, when MySQL indexes the following name: SAFAA It will actually store in the index only the first 3 characters: SAF This is done to minimize the size of the index, and to optimize database access speed. DESCRIBE command shows the key MUL for each column. This key means that multiple occurrences of a value may occur within that column, which is exactly what we want, as name or surname may appear many times. You don’t have to wait, until after creating a table to add indexes. In fact, doing so can be time-consuming, as adding an index to a large table can take a very long time. Therefore, let’s look at a command that creates the table students with indexes already in place. CREATE TABLE students ( Id_studnet SMALLINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL, surname VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL, email VARCHAR(30) NOT NULL, INDEX(name(3)), INDEX(surname(5)), ,PRIMARY KEY(id_studnet),UNIQUE(email)); Another important index, PK, its single unique key for each student to enable instant accessing of a row. The importance of having a key with a unique value for each row will come up when we start to combine data from different tables. You can add PK, while you create the table at the first time, or later by issuing the following command: ALTER TABLE students ADD PRIMARY KEY(id_student); The last important index, FULLTEXT index Unlike a regular index, MySQL’s FULLTEXT allows super-fast searches of entire columns of text. It stores every word in every data string in a special index that you can search using “natural language,” in a similar manner to using a search engine. It’s not strictly true that MySQL stores all the words in a FULLTEXT index, because it has a built-in list of more than 500 words that it chooses to ignore because they are so common that they aren’t very helpful for searching anyway. This list, called stopwords, includes the, as, is, of, and so on. The list helps MySQL run much more quickly when performing a FULLTEXT search and keeps database sizes down. FULLTEXT indexes can be created for CHAR, VARCHAR, and TEXT columns only. A FULLTEXT index definition can be given in the CREATE TABLE statement when a table is created, or added later using ALTER TABLE (or CREATE INDEX). Adding a FULLTEXT index to the table students for the columns name and surname ALTER TABLE classics ADD FULLTEXT(name,surname); this index is in addition to the ones already created and does not affect them You can now perform FULLTEXT searches across this pair of columns. If you find that MySQL is running slower than you think it should be when accessing your database, the problem is usually related to your indexes. Either you don’t have an index where you need one, or the indexes are not optimally designed. Tweaking a table’s indexes will often solve such a problem. In the next tutorial, we will learn about, using FOREIGN KEY Constraints and how to join tables together. Subscribe for more: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=saf3al2a SWE.Safaa Al-Hayali - saf3al2a
Views: 23137 Safaa Al-Hayali
Indexing Fundamentals
 
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Database indexes can drastically improve the performance of queries. They can seem like magic if you don’t understand how they work. You may have heard the terms clustered, nonclustered, or heap and are not quite sure what those terms mean. In this session, you will learn what indexes are and why the right indexes make such a big difference.
How to think in SQL, a set-based mindset - Kevin Devine
 
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One of the main sticking points for developers when they need to write SQL is thinking about the process the incorrect way. Java, C# and others require procedural thinking for optimization, but SQL optimization requires a different tactic, set-based thinking. In this talk, Kevin Devine, takes you through a number of SQL scenarios that were originally written procedurally and shows you how they were optimized using set-based thinking. We will talk about optimizer decisions like full scan, index fast full scan, index range scan, hash joins, merge joins, nested loops anti semi joins, lazy spool, hash aggregate and more. In addition, we will examine the fallacy of process-oriented thinking for SQL and focus on results-oriented thinking. At the end of this talk, you should be able to look at SQL differently and go home ready to optimize those hard to understand queries. Copyright © 2015 Stir Trek Conference, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law.
Views: 3096 Stir Trek
SQL Server Index Example
 
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Click here to Subscribe to IT PORT Channel : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMjmoppveJ3mwspLKXYbVlg Performance Comparison with bulk data in a table, between Clustered, Non clustered and Without Indexes SQL Server offers two types of indexes clustered and non-clustered. In its simplest definition a clustered index is an index that stores the actual data and a non-clustered index is just a pointer to the data. A table can only have one Clustered index and up to 999 Non-Clustered Indexes (depending on SQL version). If a table does not have a clustered index it is referred to as a Heap The primary reason indexes are built is to provide faster data access to the specific data your query is trying to retrieve. This could be either a clustered or non-clustered index. Without having an index SQL Server would need to read through all of the data in order to find the rows that satisfy the query. If you have ever looked at a query plan the difference would be an Index Seek vs a Table Scan as well as some other operations depending on the data selected
Views: 933 IT Port
Internals of Binary Tree Indexes
 
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Binary Tree Indexes For Full Course Experience Please Go To http://mentorsnet.org/course_preview?course_id=6 Full Course Experience Includes 1. Access to course videos and exercises 2. View & manage your progress/pace 3. In-class projects and code reviews 4. Personal guidance from your Mentors
Views: 16490 Oresoft LWC
Joins: Databases for Developers #5
 
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You use a join to return related rows from two or more database tables. In this episode, Chris gives a quick rundown of the following types of join: - Inner join - Outer join - Full outer join - Cross join For more details on joins, read the Oracle Database SQL Language reference: http://docs.oracle.com/database/122/SQLRF/Joins.htm#SQLRF52355 Take the Databases for Developers FREE SQL course at https://devgym.oracle.com/devgym/database-for-developers.html Need help with SQL? Ask us over on AskTOM: https://asktom.oracle.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChrisRSaxon Daily SQL Twitter tips: https://twitter.com/SQLDaily All Things SQL blog: https://blogs.oracle.com/sql/ ============================ The Magic of SQL with Chris Saxon Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Views: 5025 The Magic of SQL
How to do SQL Performance Tuning With Filtered Indexes
 
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https://wikigurus.com
Views: 2464 Viki Answers
Microsoft SQL Server Index Architecture
 
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Microsoft SQL Server Index Architecture. Simple yet powerful!
Views: 47433 RunavaTech
ODC: How to scan and commit files to UCM
 
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[http://studentsatoracle.blogspot.com] This video shows the steps needed configure Oracle Document Capture to scan and commit files to Oracle UCM (Universal Content Manager). It shows how to create a file cabinet, a scan profile and an index profile. It also creates OCR zones (optional) and commit an example invoice to the Content Server. For more information and tutorials visit our blog! Feel free to share, ask and comment!
Views: 5751 StudentsAtOracle
Non Obvious MySQL Index Optimization Tricks part 1
 
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Signup here to get the next part of this video when ready: https://www.launchclasses.com/MySQL-Index-Optimization-Tips-1 Enable subtitles and auto-translation in this video to read the transcription in your language. Every developer knows that adding indexes to database tables may speedup database queries. However, in several circumstances, this may not be the case, and your application may actually get slower when you add indexes. Watch the video of the first part of this talk that teaches what are indexes under the hood, how to determine when you should add indexes to your database tables, when you should not add indexes, and what you can do in alternative to adding indexes when using indexes may slow down your applications. Contents Non-Obvious MySQL Index Optimization Tricks What else you should know to optimize MySQL applications using indexes or not Manuel Lemos What is an Index? When to Use Indexes? What is the slow query log? How does a slow query log look like? Analyze slow queries with EXPLAIN Output of the EXPLAIN query When to not use an index? Alternatives to using indexes Queue tables Split tables with many fields Examples of split tables Conclusion
Views: 2063 Launch Classes
SQL Tuning for Beginners Lesson 1 When and Why to Tune SQL
 
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Lesson 1 in this tuning tutorial Oracle Certified Master DBA John Watson discusses when a SQL should be tuned and why. i.e. Don't waste your time tuning things that will not help.
Views: 688 SkillBuilders
Recursive Subquery Factoring : Hierarchical Queries Using Recursive WITH Clauses
 
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This video demonstrates one of the ways to query hierarchical data from Oracle. For more information see: https://oracle-base.com/articles/11g/recursive-subquery-factoring-11gr2 Website: https://oracle-base.com Blog: https://oracle-base.com/blog Twitter: https://twitter.com/oraclebase Cameo by Jeff Smith Blog: http://www.thatjeffsmith.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/thatjeffsmith Cameo appearances are for fun, not an endorsement of the content of this video.
Views: 9498 ORACLE-BASE.com