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What Your Handwriting Says About You
 
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Read people through handwriting Post to Facebook: Like BuzzFeedVideo on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1ilcE7k Post to Twitter: Music: Far from Lost by: Light-foot https://soundcloud.com/light-foot/far-from-lost-prod-by credits: images: "fun fun" https://www.flickr.com/photos/julieleuthold/7061154301 http://www.demilked.com/free-paper-textures-backgrounds/ Sources: National Pen http://www.pens.com/handwriting-infographic/ http://www.fastcodesign.com/1673219/infographic-what-does-your-handwriting-say-about-you http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200910/the-lowdown-handwriting-analysis LINKS! www.buzzfeed.com www.buzzfeed.com/video www.youtube.com/buzzfeed www.youtube.com/buzzfeedvideo www.youtube.com/buzzfeedyellow www.youtube.com/buzzfeedpop www.youtube.com/cnnbuzzfeed BUZZFEED VIDEO BuzzFeed is the world's first true social news organization. Featuring tasty, short, fun, inspiring, funny, edgy, interesting videos from theBuzzFeed. /BuzzFeedVideo is BuzzFeed's original YouTube Channel, with a focus on producing great short-form BuzzFeed videos for YouTube (and the world!). BuzzFeed Video will entertain, educate, spark conversation, inspire and delight. Subscribe to BuzzFeedVideo today and check us out at http://buzzfeed.com
Views: 17191474 As/Is
what your writing Style Explained in Hindi  part one | writing Style | graphology meaning in hindi
 
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what your writing Style Explained in Hindi part one | writing Style writing Style,what your writing Style Explained in Hindi,writing analysis in hindi,graphology books in hindi,signature analysis personality in hindi,signature analysis in hindi pdf,handwriting analysis book in hindi,graphology meaning in hindi,signature analysis tips in hindi
Views: 2012 Abhishek bhatnagar
What is PROFESSIONAL WRITING? What does PROFESSIONAL WRITING mean? PROFESSIONAL WRITING meaning
 
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What is PROFESSIONAL WRITING? What does PROFESSIONAL WRITING mean? PROFESSIONAL WRITING meaning - PROFESSIONAL WRITING definition - PROFESSIONAL WRITING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Professional writing is writing for reward or as a profession, or it is any form of written communication produced in a workplace environment or context. Works produced with the professional writing style allow professionals (e.g. employers, lawyers, businesspeople, etc.) to make informed decisions. Professional writing involves the use of precise language to convey information in a way that is easily understood by its intended audience, and it may be directed to inform, persuade, instruct, stimulate debate, or encourage action. For example, in a business office, a memorandum (abbrev. memo) can be used to provide a solution to a problem, make a suggestion, or convey information. A professional writer may be freelance, meaning he or she works on a self-employed basis, or fully employed in an occupation where a professional writing standard is a prerequisite, such as journalism, marketing, advertising, public relations, the military, or technical writing. While not necessarily the practitioner's primary profession, professional writing skills are essential in many other fields such as law, medicine, business, engineering, and social work. The audience of professional and business documents plays a significant role in the style of a professional document. Successful professional writers adapt their document to fulfill the needs of their audience. Four factors are taken into consideration when a professional writer creates a professional document: the audience's pre-existing knowledge of the covered material, the readers' expectations of style and format based on examples of the same genre, the readers' level of reading based on the reason for reading the document, and the relationship between writer and reader. The audience's pre-existing knowledge remains an important focus for a professional document because it would affect the audience's ability to read the document. For example, a general audience with little knowledge of a document's subject would be unable to read it if it contained specific, technical jargon. A professional writer would then have to minimize the amount technical jargon or define terms for the reader. Expectations of style and format are influential in the format and development of a professional document. Precedents created by earlier documents of the same genre of a professional writer's work heavily influence how the reader of his or her document will judge the credibility of both the writer and document. Documents belonging to a specific genre are expected to be written in a way that adheres to a format and style that defines that genre. If a professional writer were to produce a document that does not adhere to the precedented style, he or she and the document would lose credibility. Regarding business and professional writing, the relationship between writer and reader is key. The familiarity between the two influences the language used. For example, an employee might write more informally via email to a coworker of the same hierarchal level than he or she would write via email to his or her employer.
Views: 1778 The Audiopedia
Formal vs Informal Writing: What's the Difference and When to Use Them
 
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http://EzineArticles.com/ Before you start writing any article, one of the first things you need to ask yourself is "Who's my audience?" Answering this question will help you decide if you should use a formal writing style or an informal writing style. Watch this video to discover the difference between the two writing styles.
Views: 212863 EzineArticles
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
What is Narrative Writing
 
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Temporary use only.
Views: 95865 H Omr
3 Writing Styles - APA, Chicago & MLA (Examrace - Dr. Manishika)
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this vide explains the 3 main Writing Styles APA, Chicago, MLA. Citiations: Why Important? Formatting in research papers Standard acceptable method for citiation Avoids plagiarism Builds your credibility and shows that your ideas are shared by other scholars studying in the same field Provide all of the information so that reader can find the book/article cited Citations: Why Important? @0:33 Chicago (Turabian) @3:06 APA Style @6:11 MLA Style @9:28 Writing Style Differences @10:06 #Parenthetical #Criminal #Association #Appears #Footnotes #Superscripted #Credibility #Plagiarism #Citations #Manishika #Examrace Chicago (Turabian) Used since 1906 For all subject matter: historical journals, geography, sociology, anthropology & social sciences By University of Chicago Press Uses Footnotes – by Superscripted numerals Or Use In-Text Citations Use only page number on upper right, if heading appears on top then use page number at bottom Entire first and last name APA Style Origin: 1929 Social sciences: Business, criminal justice, economics, law Medical subjects: Nursing and psychology Create by American Psychological Association Uses only In-text citations Page number on upper right with title on left Only the initials of the first and middle name of each author Reduce bias in writing about gender, race, and other areas where discrimination is possible Year in Focus: If the research study citing is current and recent, or an arcane example of an "earlier theory" which has been debunked MLA Style 1st published by Modern Language Association of America in 1985. Used in humanities & literature Features brief parenthetical citations in the text keyed to an alphabetical list of works cited that appears at the end of the work (Smith 126) Writing Style Differences ACS (American Chemical Society) - Chemistry AIP (American Institute of Physics) - Physics ALWD (Association of Legal Writing Directors) - Legal Studies AMA (American Medical Association) - Medical Sciences AMS (American Mathematical Society) - Mathematics APSA (American Political Science Association) - Political Science, International Studies ASA (American Sociological Association) - Sociology AP (Associated Press) - Journalism, Public Relations Bluebook - Legal Studies CSE (Council of Science Editors) - Biology Harvard Business School - Business LSA (Linguistic Society of America) - Linguistics Maroonbook - Legal Studies NLM (National Library of Medicine) - Medicine Get complete postal course at http://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Paper-I-Series.htm For deatiled solutions to past paper questions visit: https://www.doorsteptutor.com/Exams/UGC/Paper-1/ Examrace is number 1 education portal for competitive and scholastic exam like UPSC, NET, SSC, Bank PO, IBPS, NEET, AIIMS, JEE and more. We provide free study material, exam & sample papers, information on deadlines, exam format etc. Our vision is to provide preparation resources to each and every student even in distant corners of the globe. Dr. Manishika Jain served as visiting professor at Gujarat University. Earlier she was serving in the Planning Department, City of Hillsboro, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA with focus on application of GIS for Downtown Development and Renewal. She completed her fellowship in Community-focused Urban Development from Colorado State University, Colorado, USA. For more information - https://www.examrace.com/About-Examrace/Company-Information/Examrace-Authors.html
Views: 54266 Examrace
WRITING – Advanced English Transitions: thereby, thereof, hereby, therein, wherein, whereby...
 
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Good writing makes use of transition words, thereby creating better flow and adding some style to the text. In this lesson we'll look at some linking words and transitions used to connect ideas, such as: "thereby", "thereof", "hereby", "therein", "wherein", "whereby", and more. This will make your writing clear and organized. Watch the video to improve your writing style. Now it's time for a lesson on some different transitions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsDR3XEv50E&index=103&list=PLxYD9HaZwsI5C0d8CivHvoI_-0rs8XMfc&t=0s TAKE THE QUIZ ON THIS LESSON: https://www.engvid.com/writing-advanced-english-transitions TRANSCRIPT Hi again, everybody. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at transitions. Now, you may have seen some other videos on engVid about transitions, especially for writing. What we're going to look at today are a few more specific transitions, but this time we're not looking at transitions between paragraphs or even transitions between sentences. Okay? We're looking at transitions that we are generally using in a sentence to shift from one idea to another idea in a sentence. So they're very similar to, like, adverb... Adverb clauses, for example, but they're used in different ways. But, again, they do have their specific purposes. Now, you'll also notice that all of them or most of them start with: "there" plus a preposition, or "where" plus a preposition, and we have the one special one: "hereby". So: "Thereby", "Thereof", "Thereafter", "Therein", "Therefore", "Wherein", "Whereby", "Hereby", these are the words we're going to look at and how they're used within sentences. Now, before I explain these to you and show them... Show you samples of how they're used, I want you to understand that these are generally very formal, very high-end. They're not very commonly used. There are other ways you can say these things without being too serious, I guess you could say. But if you're going to university, if you're going to take a test, IELTS, TOEFL, SAT, all these tests - you will see these and you should be able to use them as well. And if you can actually use them properly in your essays, and like, again, nicely, appropriately, good timing, your score... That'll help your score. It should go up quite a bit because these are not very easy to use. So, we're going to start with "thereby". "Thereby" basically means by which, or through which, or like through this action something happened. It's a little bit similar to: "due to". The only problem is you can't use it in the same structure as "due to". Okay? So let's look at the first sentence. "The team lost the final game of the season, thereby missing the playoffs." So, basically by doing this, by losing the last game, the result... What happened? They missed the playoffs. But notice that we are using an "ing" here: "...thereby missing the playoffs", right? This is basically a gerund expression, a gerund phrase, but we can't use this with a clause. We're using it with an "ing". So that's one thing you have to keep in mind. If I wanted to use "due to", I would have to change the whole structure. "Due to their loss in the final game of the season, the team missed the playoffs." A completely different structure. I'm using the independent clause, here, the "due to" with the cause, etc. This one gives you another option, basically, on how to link the ideas. Cause, effect. But we don't have to use the "ing", we can use another way. "Lisa studied for three straight weeks and was thereby able to pass her test." So she studied, studied, studied, and through this action she was able to pass her test. And: "...and was thereby", "...and she was thereby able". Notice that I'm not using this to start the clause; I'm using it within the clause, between the verbs to show through this action, this was the result that she was looking for. Okay? So: "by which", "through which action". Let's look at "therein". "The new contract does not allow for extended maternity leave;" here I'm using the semi-colon, I'm going to give you the next idea, so this is like a conjunction. "...therein lies the problem for the union, 60% of whose membership is young women". So, "therein" basically means in that, or into that situation, problem, position, state, etc. So, "therein". "Therein" means: In what? In this situation, in this new contract there's a problem. So: "...therein in this new contract lies a problem", and this is a very common follow-up to the transition "therein". "...therein lies the problem". A very famous expression: "...therein lies the rub" from Shakespeare. "Aye, there's the rub." I'm not sure if you know that expression, I think from Hamlet, dream to... If you dream and you can die, it's all good, but then: Oh, there's a problem - you don't wake up. So: "...therein lies the rub". A very common expression to use with "lies". […]
Author's Writing Style
 
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Students will learn about different aspects that go into creating an author's unique writing style. For more free educational resources, visit http://lincolnlearningsolutions.org.
The #1 Misconception About Writing Style (1/5)
 
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View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 1723 Kevin deLaplante
Oratorical, Prophetic and Romantic Writing Styles (2/5)
 
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View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 1350 Kevin deLaplante
Graphology or Handwriting Analysis
 
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Class details: http://mikemandelhypnosis.com/handwriting Mike Mandel is an expert at handwriting analysis, otherwise known as graphology. This introductory video is meant as a fun and informative way to introduce graphology to you. Enjoy! Check out our website at http://mikemandelhypnosis.com for lots more awesome stuff related to hypnosis, personal development and self improvement.
Views: 1735985 Mike Mandel Hypnosis
An Introduction to Academic Writing
 
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In this video for the NUST MISiS Academic Writing Center, English Language Fellow John Kotnarowski provides a brief introduction to academic writing in English. More than just the passive voice and formal tone, the video begins by explaining how academic English acts as the “voice” of research and moves on to discuss a few general features of academic writing in English. The video concludes with a series of comments on the value and importance effective communication in written academic English.
Views: 104324 AWUC
What is CREATIVE WRITING? What does CREATIVE WRITING mean? CREATIVE WRITING meaning & explanation
 
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Do you travel a lot? Get yourself a mobile application to find THE CHEAPEST airline tickets deals available on the market: ANDROID - http://android.theaudiopedia.com - IPHONE - http://iphone.theaudiopedia.com or get BEST HOTEL DEALS worldwide: ANDROID - htttp://androidhotels.theaudiopedia.com - IPHONE - htttp://iphonehotels.theaudiopedia.com What is CREATIVE WRITING? What does CREATIVE WRITING mean? CREATIVE WRITING meaning - CREATIVE WRITING definition - CREATIVE WRITING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Creative writing is any writing that goes outside the bounds of normal professional, journalistic, academic, or technical forms of literature, typically identified by an emphasis on narrative craft, character development, and the use of literary tropes or with various traditions of poetry and poetics. Due to the looseness of the definition, it is possible for writing such as feature stories to be considered creative writing, even though they fall under journalism, because the content of features is specifically focused on narrative and character development. Both fictional and non-fictional works fall into this category, including such forms as novels, biographies, short stories, and poems. In the academic setting, creative writing is typically separated into fiction and poetry classes, with a focus on writing in an original style, as opposed to imitating pre-existing genres such as crime or horror. Writing for the screen and stage—screenwriting and playwrighting—are often taught separately, but fit under the creative writing category as well. Creative writing can technically be considered any writing of original composition. In this sense, creative writing is a more contemporary and process-oriented name for what has been traditionally called literature, including the variety of its genres. In her work, Foundations of Creativity, Mary Lee Marksberry references Paul Witty and Lou LaBrant’s Teaching the People's Language to define creative writing. Marksberry notes: Witty and LaBrant… is a composition of any type of writing at any time primarily in the service of such needs as: 1. the need for keeping records of significant experience, 2. the need for sharing experience with an interested group, and 3. the need for free individual expression which contributes to mental and physical health.
Views: 11358 The Audiopedia
Writing a Definition Paragraph
 
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ENG 061 College Preparatory Writing II
Views: 4529 David Briggs
Amazing CALLIGRAPHY Art Writing Logos, Fonts, Designs, Styles -  Best Seb Lesters
 
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Here are the some of Amazing & SATISFYING CALLIGRAPHY Art Writing Brand Logos, Movie Titles, Fonts, Designs, styles (The Best of Seb Lester). Video Compilation Of Different types of calligraphy fonts, alphabets -|- LIKE ♥ + ♥ SHARE ♥& ((( ♥SUBSCRIBE♥ ))) For More Updates Video Topics: =========== calligraphy fonts calligraphy designs calligraphy writing calligraphy meaning calligraphy alphabet calligraphy letters calligraphy styles chinese calligraphy calligraphy fonts online english calligraphy font old english calligraphy calligraphy styles in english alphabet in calligraphy calligraphy alphabet styles calligraphy writing styles alphabet islamic calligraphy calligraphy in english calligraphy meaning in english modern calligraphy font calligraphy brush calligraphy strokes lucida calligraphy font calligraphy drawing s in calligraphy calligraphy font style a in calligraphy cursive calligraphy fancy calligraphy fonts easy calligraphy fonts learn calligraphy online a calligraphy beautiful calligraphy fonts easy calligraphy calligraphy letter designs simple calligraphy fonts meaning of calligraphy calligraphy writer english calligraphy calligraphy art calligraphy fonts alphabet calligraphy names best calligraphy fonts types of calligraphy alphabet calligraphy calligraphy converter font calligraphy calligraphy arabic online calligraphy calligraphy handwriting calligraphy online copperplate calligraphy modern calligraphy calligraphy classes calligraphy words calligraphy writing styles family calligraphy designer calligraphy fonts painting calligraphy letters script calligraphy 3 calligraphy writting calligraphy history top 10 calligraphy fonts simple calligraphy designs letter w calligraphy
Views: 57124 A to Z Video Clips
What is the Content Writing Tips and Introduction in Urdu/Hindi Tutorial
 
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Hello Guys, Welcome again to MY Solutions. In this video tutorial, you will learn that What is the Content Writing Tips and Introduction in Urdu/Hindi. Content writing is an emerging field, and if you have this skill, then you can build an empire estate by this skill. In this video tutorial, I explain the tips and the essential introduction to content writing. If you have any question regarding this video, then don't hesitate to ask us we will provide you as soon as we could. Moreover, like, share and subscribe this video and click the bell button so you can get the notification of any video uploaded on this channel. Regards, Advertising Group MY Solutions Contact: +92321-8896995 | Whatsapp: +92321-8896995 E-Mail: [email protected] Website: http://www.mywritingsolutions.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mysolutions.officials Twitter: https://twitter.com/MYSolutions2 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mysloutions/ Blog: http://mywritingsolution.blogspot.co.uk/ Goolge +: https://plus.google.com/1016313731841... #education, #solutions, #tutorial, #youtube
Views: 20845 MY Solutions
Writing style of Anjali name
 
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Subscribe this channel
Views: 6256 life in world
Know all about IELTS  ( Reading Listening  Writing & Speaking) Free English lessons
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? Know all about IELTS ( Reading, Speaking, Writing & Speaking) Free English lessons Blog : http://www.learnex.in/what-is-ielts-know-all-about-ielts-test IELTS Test Format There are two modules to choose from – Academic and General Training. IELTS Academic IELTS Academic is for test takers wishing to study at undergraduate or postgraduate levels, and for those seeking professional registration. IELTS General Training IELTS General Training is for test takers wishing to migrate to an English-speaking country (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, UK), and for those wishing to train or study at below degree level. The four components of the IELTS test IELTS Listening Timing Approximately 30 minutes (plus 10 minutes’ transfer time). Questions There are 40 questions. A variety of question types are used, chosen from the following: multiple choice, matching, plan/ map/diagram labeling, form completion, note completion, table completion, flow-chart completion, summary completion, sentence completion, short-answer questions. IELTS Reading Timing 60 minutes (no extra transfer time). There are 40 questions. A variety of question types are used, chosen from the following: multiple choice, identifying information (True/False/Not Given), identifying a writer’s views/claims (Yes/No/Not Given), matching information, matching headings, matching features, matching sentence endings, sentence completion, summary completion, note completion, table completion, flow-chart completion, diagram label completion, short-answer questions. IELTS Writing - Timing 60 minutes There are 2 tasks. You are required to write at least 150 words for Task 1 and at least 250 words for Task 2. Test Parts There are 2 parts. Academic Writing In Task 1, you are presented with a graph, table, chart or diagram and are asked to describe, summarize or explain the information in your own words. You may be asked to describe and explain data, describe the stages of a process, how something works or describe an object or event. In Task 2, you are asked to write an essay in response to a point of view, argument or problem. The issues raised are of general interest to, suitable for and easily understood by test takers entering undergraduate or postgraduate studies or seeking professional registration. Responses to Task 1 and Task 2 should be written in an academic, semi-formal/neutral style. IELTS General Training Writing In Task 1, you are presented with a situation and are asked to write a letter requesting information or explaining the situation. The letter may be personal or semi-formal/neutral in style. In Task 2, you are asked to write an essay in response to a point of view, argument or problem. The essay can be slightly more personal in style than the Academic Writing Task 2 essay. Topics are of general interest. IELTS Speaking - Timing 11-14 minutes Part 1 Introduction and interview (4-5 minutes) The examiner introduces him/herself and asks you to introduce yourself and confirm your identity. The examiner asks you general questions on familiar topics, e.g. home, family, work, studies and interests. Part 2 Individual long turn (3-4 minutes) The examiner gives you a task card which asks you to talk about a particular topic and which includes points you can cover in your talk. You are given 1 minute to prepare your talk, and are given a pencil and paper to make notes. You talk for 1-2 minutes on the topic. The examiner may then ask you one or two questions on the same topic. Part 3 Two-way discussion (4-5 minutes) The examiner asks further questions which are connected to the topic of Part 2. These questions give you an opportunity to discuss more abstract issues and ideas.
How to write a good essay: Paraphrasing the question
 
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Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay introductions. This technique is called "paraphrasing", and it means rewriting something using different words. In this lesson, I will teach you how to paraphrase successfully and how to change essay questions into your own words. These skills are very useful for university and high school students, as well as any students writing English proficiency exams like the TOEFL or IELTS. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-good-essay-paraphrasing-the-question/ WATCH NEXT: Essay Writing – 6 ways to compare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8WSzwBD7GQ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you something very important for if you're taking any type of test that has a writing component. So, if you are taking the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP, even just a university test, it can be any type of test, but if you're asked to write something like an essay or a paragraph, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a very important skill that will help improve your marks when it comes to writing on tests. So, let's get started. So, I have here an essay question. This question is actually... I've seen it on the IELTS. You know, you have similar types of questions on the TOEFL, sometimes in university. The question is this: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree or disagree?" Or maybe: "To what extent do you agree or disagree?" So, this is an example of a question you might be asked. Now, a problem a lot of students have is in their answer to this question. They see this, and they think: "Okay, education is the most important factor in the development of a country, yes, I agree." So then they... Or: "I disagree", and they start writing. And what do they write? Usually the very first thing students will write is this: "I agree that education is the single most important factor in the development of a country because..." So, what is the problem with this? Is there any problem to start off your essay with something like this, or to start off your answer? There's a big problem. So I want you to take a moment and think: "What could be the problem with starting your essay off with this sentence?" Okay, well, if you noticed, you have here the word: "education, education, is, is, the single most important, most important factor". If you notice, these are the same. They're the exact same, except for: "I agree that" and "because". The student, here, has used the exact same wording that is in the question. So, if you do this on the IELTS-and many students do this, same with on the TOEFL-you actually will lose marks, and same with in university, because you're not showing your abilities; you're just copying what somebody else has said or what the essay question is. So, in this video, I'm going to show you first off... First off, I'm going to tell you: Don't do this, don't copy. And I'm going to teach you ways in order to improve yourself and your answer by changing this wording. How can you change your introduction so it's different than what the question is? Okay? So, let's look at how to make these changes. Okay, so what we are going to do in order to change the question into a proper answer that doesn't just copy the question, is we are going to paraphrase. So, the word here is: "paraphrase". This might be a new word for you. What does it mean to paraphrase something? Well, when we paraphrase, it means we take a sentence that, you know... We take somebody else's sentence and we change it into our own words. Okay? So, we change the words of a sentence, we also change maybe the sentence structure, but we keep all the same meaning. Okay? So, the meaning from the sentence you copy, it stays the same, same meaning, but different words and different sentence structure. Okay? So it's in your words, but this other person's meaning. So, we are going to paraphrase this example of a question into our own words. So, first we're going to look at how to do that using vocabulary and synonyms. So, we have here the same question: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country." How can we put this into new words or our own words that keep the same meaning? Well, we can use synonyms. So, this might be a new word for you, too. A "synonym". "Synonyms" are words that have the same meaning, but are different words.
Chinese is NOT picture writing! - History of Writing Systems #5 (Determinatives)
 
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Watch this ancient Chinese scribe figure out how to use a fixed set of characters to write limitless words in his language. How? By combining meaning writing (logographs) and sound writing (rebus)! The result is a set of helpful hints called determinatives, because they help you determine the meaning of a pronunciation character. Determinatives show up in Mayan, Egyptian and other ancient writing systems. In Hanzi (Chinese) and Kanji (Japanese) they're called radicals, simply because they narrow down the root meaning (the "radix") of the written character. While we're visiting China, we'll stumble across an unexpected tension: should writing be easier for the reader to read or for the writer to write? Oh, and why don't we go a step further? What if we pat Chinese characters on the back, say "nice try" and take our scripts ALL THE WAY to pronunciation writing? Tune in next time! The entire story of writing: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLc4s09N3L2h3HtaAYVqOVKGt2h6wRasw2 Who created this? Art, animation and music by NativLang CC-BY and public domain credits: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zyYKGKVOZmDG1F71zaCcV69FSYtWk_SKT14tMQcFGU8/edit?usp=sharing
Views: 261540 NativLang
Shakespeare's Writing Styles -- Part 1
 
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Discusses Shakespeare's use of iambic pentameter and blank verse
Views: 9576 Miss Alagar
What is NATURE WRITING? What does NATURE WRITING mean? NATURE WRITING meaning & explanation
 
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What is NATURE WRITING? What does NATURE WRITING mean? NATURE WRITING meaning - NATURE WRITING definition - NATURE WRITING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Nature writing is nonfiction or fiction prose or poetry about the natural environment. Nature writing encompasses a wide variety of works, ranging from those that place primary emphasis on natural history facts (such as field guides) to those in which philosophical interpretation predominate. It includes natural history essays, poetry, essays of solitude or escape, as well as travel and adventure writing. Nature writing often draws heavily on scientific information and facts about the natural world; at the same time, it is frequently written in the first person and incorporates personal observations of and philosophical reflections upon nature. Modern nature writing traces its roots to the works of natural history that were popular in the second half of the 18th century and throughout the 19th. An important early figures was the "parson-naturalist" Gilbert White (1720 – 1793), a pioneering English naturalist and ornithologist. He is best known for his Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789). William Bartram (1739 – 1823) is a significant early American pioneer naturalist who first work was published in 1791. Gilbert White is regarded by many as England's first ecologist, and one of those who shaped the modern attitude of respect for nature. He said of the earthworm: "Earthworms, though in appearance a small and despicable link in the chain of nature, yet, if lost, would make a lamentable chasm. worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them" White and William Markwick collected records of the dates of emergence of more than 400 plant and animal species in Hampshire and Sussex between 1768 and 1793, which was summarised in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, as the earliest and latest dates for each event over the 25-year period, are among the earliest examples of modern phenology. The tradition of clerical naturalists predates White and can be traced back to some monastic writings of the Middle Ages, although some argue that their writings about animals and plants cannot be correctly classified as natural history. Notable early parson-naturalists were William Turner (1508–1568), John Ray (1627–1705), William Derham (1657–1735). William Bertram, In 1773. embarked upon a four-year journey through eight southern American colonies. Bartram made many drawings and took notes on the native flora and fauna, and the native American Indians. In 1774, he explored the St. Johns River. William Bartram wrote of his experiences exploring the Southeast in his book known today as Bartram's Travels, published in 1791. Ephraim George Squier and Edwin Hamilton Davis, in their book, Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley, name Bartram as "the first naturalist who penetrated the dense tropical forests of Florida." After Gilbert White and William Bertram, other signifiant writers include American ornithologist John James Audubon (1785 – 1851), Charles Darwin (1809 – 1882), Richard Jefferies (1848 – 1887), and Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862), who is often considered the father of modern American nature writing, Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 – 1882) John Burroughs, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, M. Krishnan, and Edward Abbey (although he rejected the term for himself). Another important early work is A History of British Birds by Thomas Bewick, published in two volumes. Volume 1, "Land Birds", appeared in 1797. Volume 2, "Water Birds", appeared in 1804. The book was effectively the first "field guide" for non-specialists. Bewick provides an accurate illustration of each species, from life if possible, or from skins. The common and scientific name(s) are listed, citing the naming authorities. The bird is described, with its distribution and behaviour, often with extensive quotations from printed sources or correspondents. Critics note Bewick's skill as a naturalist as well as an engraver.
Views: 1396 The Audiopedia
Writing - Transitions - THEREFORE, THUS, CONSEQUENTLY
 
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http://www.engvid.com Learn how to use "therefore" and "thus" to show you have reached a conclusion. These transitions will improve your writing by helping you link ideas. In this lesson, we will look at transitions of conclusion and consequence to help ideas flow and improve our writing styles. I'll also teach you how you can use words like "so", "then", "hence", and "as a result" for the same purpose. Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-transitions-therefore-thus-consequently/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi, again. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is -- actually, I had a few requests for it. So I'm not going to mention names right now because there are too many to mention. But some people asked me about transitions, again, specifically, "therefore" and "thus". But I figured I would do the whole package because they can all work together. If you're writing essays, you can use more than one of these, more than two of these, especially for longer essays. So first, we're going to look at the differences or similarities -- as the case may be -- of these words and when and how they are used. Okay? So the words we're looking at today are "therefore", "thus", "consequently", "so", "then, "hence", and the expression "as a result". Okay? So again, all of these are transitions. I'll put it here. So a little review. What is a transition? A transition is like a bridge that connects two ideas. Okay? So what are we connecting here? What are the ideas that we want to connect? We want to connect a logical conclusion. Okay? Or we want to connect a consequence. What is a "consequence"? A consequence is, basically, a result. So for example, in life, we make choices, we make decisions, and then, we have to live with the consequences, whatever those choices bring us. Okay? So there's a very, very slight difference in these three words, especially. These are the three that I want you to use most on essays if you're going to be writing essays. Okay? We use "therefore" -- again, it's more of a mathematical word, but we use it, obviously, to write, as well. When we have a premise, from there premise, we generally reach a conclusion. Now, what is a "premise"? A "premise" is an idea that we believe to be true. And because we believe it is true, from that truth we reach a conclusion. Okay? I think everybody knows a very famous "premise + conclusion" sentence. "I think" -- premise -- "I believe that I think, therefore I am." That's the conclusion I reach. Because I think, I am. Okay. Don't be confused. It's not "because". Premise and conclusion, but I'm just trying to simplify it a little bit. "Thus" means "result". Now, it's a little bit different from "consequence". "Result" means a result of the last argument. Okay? And "consequence" is -- again, it's a result, but a consequence. Something's going to happen as a result of the thing before. Now, it's very, very important to remember, something had to be mentioned before you can use any of these words. Okay? All of these words and whatever sentence or clause or whatever comes after it is in relation to what came before. Okay? I said something before; this is my conclusion now. Or this is the result of what happened or this is the consequence. More informally, we can use "so" also to talk about a consequence or a result. We use "then". So, "This happened. Then, I did this." Not "then" like time, like sequence. "Then" means more like, "This happened, so I did this." "This happened. Then, I did that as a result of the first thing." Now, a lot of people ask me about this word, "hence". The first thing I will say is don't use it. One, it's a bit old-fashioned and a bit snobby. And two, most people don't use it correctly anyway. I personally don't like this word, but if you must use it, then, remember it's also like a consequence. Use it instead of "thus" -- probably instead of "therefore". And of course, very casual, "as a result". Okay? So before we look at this -- all of these individually, let's look at some examples. "I am cold." Okay? This is the situation. "I am cold. Therefore, I'll put on a coat." [Coughs] Excuse me. Actually, you know what? Let me change this. Sorry. I'll put a period here. If I were going to use "therefore" with this, I would start a new sentence. All of these words can be used to start a sentence or mid-sentence. But some of them are better used to start. Some of them are better used in the middle. "I'm cold. Therefore, I'll put on a coat."
Defining Your Writing Style
 
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Read the full blog here. http://www.thejuvogroup.com/resources/defining-your-brand Learn more about us here. http://www.thejuvogroup.com/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thejuvogroup Twitter https://twitter.com/juvogroup
Views: 42 TheJuvoGroup
The Philosophy of Style - Writing & Linguistics
 
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“The Philosophy of Style,” explored a growing trend of formalist approaches to writing. Highly focused on the proper placement and ordering of the parts of an English sentence, [Spencer] created a guide for effective composition. Spencer’s aim was to free prose writing from as much "friction and inertia" as possible, so that the reader would not be slowed by strenuous deliberations concerning the proper context and meaning of a sentence. Keeping in mind these general truths, we shall be in a condition to understand certain causes of effect in composition now to be considered. Every perception received, and every conception realized, entailing some amount of waste--or, as Liebig would say, some change of matter in the brain; and the efficiency of the faculties subject to this waste being thereby temporarily, though often but momentarily, diminished; the resulting partial inability must affect the acts of perception and conception that immediately succeed. Read By Gary Gilberd. About AUTHOR: Herbert Spencer (27 April 1820 – 8 December 1903) was an English philosopher, biologist, anthropologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist of the Victorian era. Review By Диана : Jan16,2015 "http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/2703136" This book was such a pleasure. Herbert Spencer sets here to describe the rules that capture how best to use language - namely how to convey ideas in such a way so that they leave their impression while at the same time the mental energies and mental sensitivities of the reader/listener are economised. (Thus for example the principle of the ‘economy of mental energies’ is itself one of the principles of composition.) Some of the rules Spencer describes are fairly straightforward - eg the rule that one should put the word producing the greatest impression at the end of a list and not at its start. Other of the rules are more original - eg the one that shorter words are in most cases to be preferred to longer ones (this making in English Saxon words preferable to those of Latin origin). Except, Spencer says, when the word is supposed to produce a great impression, in which case a greater length might be an advantage, because it makes the mind spend a longer time on the idea. Those rules are not laid out at random; as seen above, Spencer keeps in mind the process of thought-formation while perceiving words, sentences, texts; (the rules can be said to be rules just because their use brings about the least frustration to the perceiving mind, while at the same time producing the greatest impression). This process of thought-formation I find quite interesting to meditate on. My favourite rule that Spencer mentions is the one that in a phrase the adjective should precede the noun, and not the other way around. That is, it is better to say ‘black horse’ (with the English), rather than ‘horse black’ (as the Spanish say: ‘caballo negro’). This is so, Spencer argues, because if we say ‘horse black’ the mind is first impelled to think about a horse before it hears the specification ‘black’. However, since one cannot imagine a colourless horse, the mind necessarily imagines a horse of a particular colour, say a brown one (since brown horses are most common). Thus the mind has already spent some effort in forming the idea of a horse of a particular colour when, at subsequently hearing the adjective ‘black’, the mind has to modify the idea that has already started to form. All this re-modification wastes mental energy, Spencer argues, and so it is better to put the more abstract, less specified in front - the adjective in front of the noun. Overall, I really liked the idea of the book. It is basically a search for the most efficient way to use a language system, and it makes me wonder if there is such a thing as an objectively most efficient language. Some of the rules Spencer describes might be controversial, but all are thought-provoking, as is the book itself. PS: I listened to the LibriVox audiobook - although the narration wasn’t the very best I’ve heard, it is definitely quite good, so I would recommend a listen. Our Website: http://www.mysticbooks.org Social-Link: www.fb.com/Mysticbooks.org www.twitter.com/mysticbooks1
Views: 1191 Mystic Books
What is WRITING CIRCLE? What does WRITING CIRCLE mean? WRITING CIRCLE meaning & explanation
 
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What is WRITING CIRCLE? What does WRITING CIRCLE mean? WRITING CIRCLE meaning - WRITING CIRCLE definition - WRITING CIRCLE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A writing circle is a group of like-minded writers needing support for their work, either through writing peer critiques, workshops or classes, or just encouragement. There are many different types of writing circles or writing groups based on location, style of writing, or format. Normally, the goal of a writing circle is to improve one's own craft by listening to the works and suggestions of others in the group. It also builds a sense of community, and allows new writers to become accustomed to sharing their work. Writing circles can be helpful inside and outside of the classroom. A writing circle brings writers from different walks of life together in one place to discuss their work in a workshop style setting. Writers will be able to give feedback and hear suggestions from fellow writers. It can build community in a classroom and help students gain public speaking cleans. This workshop method could be used for any genre of writing (creative prose, poetry, etc.). Writing circles can build a sense of community and help writers become more confident in their own work. They teach writers how give and receive constructive criticism enable them to learn from one another's mistakes and successes and appreciate different opinions and views. In some cases writing circles can be used a form of group therapy (Writing for healing).
Views: 51 The Audiopedia
Mohsin Hamid Writing Style
 
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This edited montage of Mohsin Hamid's writing style goes with The Reluctant Fundamentalist lesson.
Views: 240 Donald Cady
Writing Styles - Which One is Yours ?
 
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I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (https://www.youtube.com/editor)
Views: 55 Mark Twain
The Tone of Academic Writing
 
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Learn the key differences between a formal and an informal style of writing. For more information, please visit http://www.natureofwriting.com/tone-and-audience/
Views: 1266 The Nature of Writing
Majuscule writing Meaning
 
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Video shows what majuscule writing means. Writing composed wholly of capital letters, especially the style which prevailed in Europe from the third to the sixth century.. majuscule writing pronunciation. How to pronounce, definition by Wiktionary dictionary. majuscule writing meaning. Powered by MaryTTS
Views: 24 SDictionary
What Is The Definition Of Formal Writing?
 
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Googleusercontent search. Formal and informal language formal writing definition, rules & examples video lesson study academy definition. Making your writing informal language is more commonly used in situations that are relaxed and involve people we know well. Formal language and informal are associated with particular writing to communicate, which we call 'formal writing,' is an essential the kinds of expected them,; Internalize criteria that define good writing, this revision bite will show you how adapt your make it more formal use in. Formal writing assignments uw la crosse. What is a formal letter definitions nc state 4 serverdefining your topic monash university. A formal definition is a one sentence explanation of the meaning word. What is the difference between formal and informal language definitions structure of a definition. Simple short sentences are acceptable and sometimes essential to making a point in informal writing 1 may 2017 composition, formal style is broad term for speech or marked by an impersonal, objective, precise use of language. The difference between formal and informal writing word mart. Formal writing is often used for business and academic work, but considering audience purpose can help you determine whether formal or informal the appropriate choice style. When you write a formal 1. The structure of a formal definition. There are also examples where spoken english can be very formal, for example, in a speech or lecture. Online technical writing extended definition tu chemnitz. For other types of writing you may wish to a) include a glossary terms, or b) one the first things do when write an extended definition is compose formal sentence term are aboutFormal and informal language definition, rules & examples video lesson styles prose style thoughtco. Also, an instructor annotated student paper can be very helpful as a definition of formal writing in the legal dictionary by free online english and encyclopedia. Formal writing style studio. Consider these two examples example 1 this is to inform you that formal and informal language serve different purposes. See more the term formal letter can be used to entail any written for a purpose, whether that recommendation letter, an invitation complaint problems in student writing is tendency discuss words have not been defined. But first, you will learn about formal definition, being in accordance with the usual requirements, customs, etc. Of or denoting a style writing public speaking characterized by more elaborate grammatical structures and conservative technical vocabulary or, you could analyze an existing ideal student paper to define those goals features. Usf tampa libraries formal and informal language cambridge dictionary. Html url? Q webcache. What is formal writing? Meaning of writing as a 18 apr 2012 center consultant haili vinson helps explain what style means and how to do it in your own work. Colloquial informal writing is similar to a spoken conversation.
Views: 34 Cynthia Cynthia
√ Newspaper Writing Style - Text Type Studies | English
 
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#iitutor #English #NewspaperWritingStyle https://www.iitutor.com/ Writing for a newspaper embodies the philosophy of ‘less means more’. Journalists write less on the page to focus more eyeballs on their article and save the editor having to cut them off. Writing concisely refers to only writing what is required and cutting out the rest. Journalists do this in order to make their articles as short as possible. It also makes what they write clear and direct. They do not overuse description or vocabulary, and concentrate on simply telling a reader what is important. A ‘reading age’ is how a journalist’s writing style and vocabulary is tailored towards readers. It refers to reading level that a particular newspaper targets. Depending on the publication, the age is generally set at either an 8th or 10th grade reading level.  Newspapers articles (not features or columnists) are meant to be objective. This means that they are unbiased. News articles are written in the following ways: Present both sides of the story Written in passive voice Adopt a neutral tone Allow the reader form their opinion Passive Voice is where the writer or speaker is ‘removed’ from what takes place. They have no active role or opinion. Journalists use passive voice to remain impartial and avoid making accusations that cannot be proven. They present ‘facts’ in such a way that a reader can draw their own conclusions. The Story: Monty and Jasper are two boys who had an argument in the school yard. Monty claims that a $2 coin that Jasper found was his, while Jasper claims that he simply found the coin lying in the grass. Sensationalism Thievery and verbal arguments are rife within a local primary school, with two students reprimanded over an ugly dispute involving a two dollar coin. Tips for Your Writing There are a number of lessons from the newspaper journalistic style that you can apply to your own writing: Eliminate wordiness Don’t overextend your vocabulary Be direct Make every word important Edit, edit, edit! Newspaper articles are concisely written They are (mostly) objective Use passive voice
Views: 3318 iitutor.com
Billie Eilish Talks About Writing Songs And Fake Pop Stars | For The Record
 
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Billie Eilish was just 14 when she emerged on the scene with her debut single “ocean eyes” in 2016. The soulful song quickly transformed into a viral sensation that currently stands with over 44 million Spotify streams. The singer-songwriter’s career has continued to flourish with sonically mature songs like “bellyache” and the 13 Reasons Why track “Bored,” and last year she released her critically acclaimed debut EP don’t smile at me. Read more on Genius: https://genius.com/a/billie-eilish-talks-about-loving-meme-able-artists-her-songwriting-process-more-on-for-the-record Read all the lyrics to "dont smile at me" on Genius: https://genius.com/albums/Billie-eilish/Dont-smile-at-me-ep Subscribe to Genius: http://bit.ly/2cNV6nz Genius on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Genius Genius on Instagram: http://instagram.com/genius Genius on Facebook: https://facebook.com/Geniusdotcom http://genius.com
Views: 710107 Genius
Creative SAC: Writing in the author's style (Burial Rites)
 
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Rewriting an ok passage into a better, stronger passage that mimics Hannah Kent's style. SUBSCRIBE and LIKE for regular suggestions and tips on how to get better marks in English! www.TSEtuition.com www.facebook.com/TSEtuition
Views: 1588 TSE Tuition
Steven Pinker on Good Writing, with Ian McEwan
 
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Want to join the debate? Check out the Intelligence Squared website to hear about future live events and podcasts: http://www.intelligencesquared.com __________________________ http://www.intelligencesquared.com/events/steven-pinker-ian-mcewan-good-writing/ Filmed at the Royal Geographical Society on 25th September 2014. Steven Pinker is one of the world’s leading authorities on language, mind and human nature. A professor of psychology at Harvard, he is the bestselling author of eight books and regularly appears in lists of the world’s top 100 thinkers. On September 25th 2014 he returned to the Intelligence Squared stage to discuss his latest publication 'The Sense of Style', a short and entertaining writing guide for the 21st century. Pinker will argue that bad writing can’t be blamed on the internet, or on “the kids today”. Good writing has always been hard: a performance requiring pretence, empathy, and a drive for coherence. He answered questions such as: how can we overcome the “curse of knowledge”, the difficulty in imagining what it’s like not to know something we do? And how can we distinguish the myths and superstitions about language from helpful rules that enhance clarity and grace? Pinker showed how everyone can improve their mastery of writing and their appreciation of the art. Professor Pinker was in conversation with Ian McEwan, one of Britain’s most acclaimed novelists, who has frequently explored the common ground between art and science.
Views: 196026 iqsquared
What Is The Style Of Writing?
 
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Academic writing refers to a particular style of expression that researchers use define the intellectual boundaries their disciplines and areas different styles are separated by differences in diction, tone, sentence strucure more. There's no great mystique about an 'academic writing style'. Style definition and examples of style literary devices. A writer's style is a reflection of his or her personality, unique voice, and way approaching the audience readers. Shakespeare's writing style and metrical patternacademic organizing your social sciences research mastering different styles of 7 tips. Academic writing style library and learning resources. Writing styles expository, descriptive writing style wikipedia. The most important thing is to keep your writing clear and concise style for reports. Style is the way in which something written, as opposed to meaning of what written. What is writing style? Types & examples video lesson four different types of styles expository, descriptive style, diction, tone, and voice what a simple breakdown the styles? Quora. This page identifies the main styles of writing that style. Do you know someone who always dresses in black or never wears plaid? Maybe the 19 jul 2011 research has shown that rhetorical styles writing vary around for an inductive deductive style of your own country when it 1. As the style in writing can be defined as way a writer writes and it is technique which an individual author uses his. However, every piece writers write is for a specific purpose example, may want to explain how something works or persuade people agree with their point of view this page part our section on study skills, the skills you need help and learn effectively. Googleusercontent search. Writing style university of warwick. Writing style wikipedia en. It varies from author to and 14 sep 2012 here's a simple breakdown explaining the difference between an author's writing voice style definition, usage list of examples in common speech literature. I've got to go town in the morning, but i haven't 19 sep 2016 your writing style evolves naturally over time through reading and writing, here is a list of things keep mind as you develop 13 definition style, fiction writer, basically way write, opposed what write about (though two are definitely when thinking first consider clothes people wear. Beyond the essential elements of spelling, grammar, and punctuation, writing style is choice words, sentence structure, paragraph used to convey meaning effectively 14 may 2015 just like clothes, can express a specific. Writing style for reports skills hub university of sussex. The style in writing can be defined as the way a writer writes and it is styles of. There are four main types of writing expository, persuasive, descriptive, and narrative 10 may 2016. His plays were everything you need to know about the writing style of george orwell s 1984, written by experts with in mind definition. Learn how to master writing style in 7 ti
Views: 9 sweet sparky
Poe's Writing Style
 
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A brief discussion of writing techniques that appear prominently in Poe's prose and poetry.
Views: 822 Scott Lee
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 458777 DiveIn Learning
Tutorial on Style in Professional Writing: Conciseness
 
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"Revising for conciseness to create efficient workplace messages" briefly explains how to fix the common problems that interfere with conciseness in any document at work. The video is based on the research-based principles published in Revising Professional Writing (see parlaypress.com). The video uses the example of a non-profit business plan. You can see a copy of the document at ProsWrite.com.
Views: 4622 ProsWrite
Forms of Writing: Poem, Drama & Prose - Differences, Fun & Educational Activities for Children
 
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Faced with a tough writing assignment, Mom comes to the rescue to explain writing styles. How to define the Poem, Drama and Prose, and its structural elements. Identify the major differences between the three forms of writing. With practical activities. Recommended for grade 4. Kids Educ SUBSCRIBE TO US http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc?sub_confirmation=1 To see the more kids movies go to http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc
Writing names in Calligraphy 1
 
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I used a Brause Rose nib and sumi ink
Introduction to Japanese Writing
 
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Learn Japanese with real lessons by real teachers. Get your FREE Lifetime Account at https://goo.gl/9iCrO9 Want Japanese delivered to your iPhone or iPad every day? Get the new Daily Dose app for free! https://goo.gl/767QGc In this lesson, you'll learn a little about Japanese Writing. Subscribe for more videos: http://j.mp/SubscribeToJapanesePod101 For more Pronunciation videos, click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GnfM8wQ9PZk&list=PLPSfPyOOcp3Q7GGD_INKRn6MWUHnvTXxw Please LIKE, SHARE and COMMENT on our videos! We really appreciate it. Thanks! Want more Japanese learning videos? Click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MHudeT01g4&list=PLPSfPyOOcp3Q1YWaj9JV9XB1OA_m1-Rdy Follow and write to us using hashtag #JapanesePod101 - Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/JapanesePod101 - Google Plus : https://plus.google.com/+JapanesePod101 - Twitter : https://twitter.com/JapanesePod101 - Pinterest : https://www.pinterest.com/JapanesePod101/
House Style Writing Definition
 
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SUBSCRIBE TO CHANNEL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaIagYBCTympqr9pdDF8-YA?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 11 House Styles
What is PERFORMATIVE WRITING? What does PERFORMATIVE WRITING mean? PERFORMATIVE WRITING meaning
 
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What is PERFORMATIVE WRITING? What does PERFORMATIVE WRITING mean? PERFORMATIVE WRITING meaning - PERFORMATIVE WRITING definition - PERFORMATIVE WRITING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Performative writing is a form of post-modernist or avant-garde academic writing, often taking as its subject a work of visual art or performance art. It is heavily informed by critical theory, but arises ultimately from linguistic ideas around performative utterances. The term is often applied to a bricolage of other writing styles. It is claimed to be politically radical, because it thus 'defies' literary conventions and traditions. It is often practiced by feminist writers. A notable current writer in performative writing is the performance art theorist Peggy Phelan. She describes the form as one which.... "enacts the death of the 'we' that we think we are before we begin to write. A statement of allegiance to the radicality of unknowing who we are becoming, this writing pushes against the ideology of knowledge as a progressive movement forever approaching a completed end-point." (Mourning Sex, 1997) Such a writing form is claimed to be, in itself, a form of performance. It is said to more accurately reflect the fleeting and ephemeral nature of a performance, and the various mechanisms of memory and referentiality that happen during and after the performance. Critics of performative writing have described it, in practice, as: self-indulgent; insular; politically neutred due to its tiny elite audience and its neo-romantic individualism; obscurantist; often bearing only a loose relationship to the works of art it claims to be about; and dependent on the funding (of universities and public arts funding) of the very state that it claims to be against. Also that, when taught, it often paradoxically expects students to reveal personal truths and use experimental forms within a strict classroom regimen of grades, lesson attendance and exams. It can generally be seen to follow the pattern of much modernist writing, in that it seeks to create complex new literary approaches in order to seal off 'high art culture' from the attention of ordinary people and from a mass culture. The term performative writing should not be confused with "writing that is performed", i.e.: plays, radio or poetry readings. Performative writing is sometimes referred to by the alternative name of 'creative critical writing'—which is not to be confused with straightforward creative writing.
Views: 75 The Audiopedia
WRITING STYLE 4: Clauses and Coordination
 
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This is the fourth lesson in Dr. Chandler's series on writing style. These lectures are deeply indebted to Martha J. Kolin and Loretta S. Gray's excellent guide Rhetorical Grammar. They also make use of instructive materials found in The Well-Crafted Sentence by Nora Bacon and They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
Views: 5534 demarcations
Improve your Writing: Show, Not Tell
 
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Become a better writer, no matter what you're writing! I'll show you how to take simple, boring sentences and turn them to vibrant, expressive writing. As you practice this technique in your writing, you will find it carries over to your everyday spoken English as well. Before you know it, you'll be a more dynamic, compelling speaker and writer. Next, watch this video to improve your vocabulary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxjsWwgPjwM Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/english-writing-show-not-tell/ TRANSCRIPT Welcome back to engVid. Here we are with a writing lesson. We are looking at the skill of showing, not telling, and it's going to transform your writing as long as you put it into practice afterwards. "Show, not tell. What's he talking about?" When we're writing we want to avoid simple statements that don't really add any description or flavour. For example: "The man was stressed." [Snores] Boring. Instead, I want you to paint a picture, I really want you to describe the man is stressed without telling me that he is. So how can you do that? We're kind of trying to avoid this word, and describe it instead. So what's he doing? "The man was fidgeting. Ah, he's fidgeting. He's so stressed, he can't sort of stay still. And biting his nails." Okay? So pick out a couple of details that show how the person was. Next one: "The room was messy." Again, it's a simple, simple sentence. It's just one sort of main clause and it's not very interesting. Much better to describe the items in the room that make it messy. For example: "There was a leftover pizza, dirty clothes were strewn"... I'll write that word for you. That means they were covering the floor. "...and there were dirty plates and cups". Okay? These details give us the idea that it is messy. Example three: "The woman was confident." Okay, but it would be much more effective if you described how she was confident. So, how does she move? How do other people react to her? "She strode", that means she walked, but with purpose. Okay? So I've picked an interesting verb. "She strode into the room, and everyone turned their heads to notice her." Okay? Much clearer, more vivid idea of confidence than just saying she was confident. Example four: "The boy was careful." Tell us how he was careful. "He placed his favourite magazine in the top drawer of his cabinet." Okay? So we need to say exactly what he is placing, the object there has been missed out. "He placed"... There's no room for me to write it. You get the idea, he places his favourite book or magazine, and look how specific it is: "the top drawer of his cabinet". Next example: "The stadium was full." Again, I'm bored with this simple sentence construction. We need to make it more interesting. "The sound from the stadium was deafening", okay? And then give us some main action perhaps: "The sound from the stadium was deafening as the crowd rose up to chant the player's name." Okay? Give the sense that the stadium is full from what you can see and what you can hear. Okay? A couple of ones to describe weather. "It was hot." Okay? Well, a very young child could write a sentence like that, so if you're sort of a teenager or an adult, it's time to raise the bar. How can we tell that it is hot? Well: "The sun was causing damage to", "The sun was melting", "The sun was burning", "The sun was causing the lady's skin to turn red". Okay? Pick out details that show the effect. "It was cold. It was cold." How do we know it was cold? How cold did it feel? What can you see? "Drainpipes were freezing, ice was as thick as"... I don't know. "It was three inches thick." Whatever, you've got to show details rather than just stating things. -"It was windy." -"The umbrella was totally bent out of shape. The umbrella"-you know for keeping the rain off us-"was totally"-that means fully-"bent"-Yeah? Bent-"...out of shape", out of its normal position. "He found it funny." Right? How funny did he find it? Okay? Better to... For us to get the idea to picture what he was doing: "He was rolling around the floor in hysterics." Okay? When you're so... Find something so funny, you're like: [Laughs]. Okay? He can't control his body he finds it so funny. "Hysterics", that means like totally lost control. "Hysteria". Okay? Hysterics. "In hysterics" means finding something really, really funny. "The castle was captured." Right. I want to get a sense of drama. I want to imagine what's happening there at the castle. Is the king having his head cut off? Are the new army marching in? What's happening? "The new flag was hoisted up on high, greeted by a cheer from the crowd." Okay? Paint pictures, pick out details. Okay? It's good to have a range of adjectives, but how can you show those adjectives? How can you describe them instead? Thank you for watching today's video. Have a go at the quiz after this, and I'll see you very soon. Remember to subscribe. Bye.

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